A Sociolinguistic History of Early Identities in Singapore: by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew

By Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew

What function does race, geography, faith, orthography and nationalism play within the crafting of identities? What are the origins of Singlish? This booklet bargains an intensive research of previous and new identities in Asia's so much worldwide urban, tested during the lens of language.

Show description

Read Online or Download A Sociolinguistic History of Early Identities in Singapore: From Colonialism to Nationalism PDF

Similar asia books

Recession and Its Aftermath: Adjustments in the United States, Australia, and the Emerging Asia

Marketplace failure at medium durations is inevitable in a capitalist financial system. Such mess ups is probably not heavily obvious within the brief run simply because industry adjusts call for via hoarding of stock or import of required items and providers. The marketplace additionally adjusts call for in the end via growth of involved commercial output and in addition by means of the access of latest businesses.

Old Javanese (Kawi)

LINGUISTICS

Climate Change Challenges and Adaptations at Farm-level: Case Studies from Asia and Africa (CABI Climate Change Series)

This ebook emphasizes the position of farm point variation as a key in developmental pathways which are challenged by means of weather dangers within the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. It throws gentle on key matters that come up in farm point affects, edition and vulnerability to weather switch and discusses Q2 methodological techniques undertaken in research domain names of Asia and Africa.

Extra info for A Sociolinguistic History of Early Identities in Singapore: From Colonialism to Nationalism

Example text

It must be noted that English education was only available to a minority of the Malay population. From the onset, there was always a fear that if too many natives spoke it as well as the British, they might become just as educated and would probably challenge European rule – particularly, the race-based exclusions which prevented them from rising to higher levels of power within the colonial state machinery. In 1870, Frank Swettenham then Resident of Perak, pronounced that too much English might give too many the “delusions of grandeur”: “ ...

The prime site occupied by St Andrew’s Cathedral in the heart of Singapore was expressly reserved in 1826 by Sir Stamford Raffles for an Anglican edifice (Woods, 1958). Other prime sites in the city were also allocated to churches such as the Presbyterians in 1878 and the Brethren in 1879 (Makepeace et al. 1921: 262; Finlay, 1964: 26). J. ” Interestingly, the British designated the Malay population as clearly “Muslims”, thus setting the stage for Islam to become closely identified as “the religion of the Malays”, rather than as a universal faith in its own right irrespective of race.

From the onset, there was always a fear that if too many natives spoke it as well as the British, they might become just as educated and would probably challenge European rule – particularly, the race-based exclusions which prevented them from rising to higher levels of power within the colonial state machinery. In 1870, Frank Swettenham then Resident of Perak, pronounced that too much English might give too many the “delusions of grandeur”: “ ... I do not think it is at all advisable to give to the children of an agricultural population an indifferent knowledge of a language that to all but the very few would only unfit them for the duties of life and make them discontented with anything like manual labour.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.56 of 5 – based on 5 votes